MILLIONS OF CHILDREN ARE EXPOSED TO CHILD ABUSE DAILY

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HELP PREVENT CHILD ABUSE

IIMGC PREVENT CHILD ABUSE

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 HELP STOP AND PREVENT  ANY FORM OF CHILD ABUSE

IF YOU SEE ONE, DONT LOOK AWAY REPORT TO THE RELEVANT AUTHORITIES.

Millions of children are exposed to some form of violence every single day: They are brutally beaten, slandered, and sexually abused, it has become an everyday reality for millions of children worldwide. Some children are vulnerably exposed to street violence, home abuse, and school punishments. This is usually done to instil fear and respect into these children at a young age.

IIMGC believes every child deserves love and their time should be spent building up confidence and sense of security, instead, fear, hatred, and pain. Children who are constantly beaten by their parents will show up to school with bruises, black eyes, burns, and broken hearts. A broken faith, no hope, and a feeling of being helpless. An abused child always feel a sense of no worth, they often wonder why they are not loved, they wonder why no one is protecting them; as they endure horrors every time they arrive home.

“Close to 300 million children are regularly subjected to violence.” (UNICEF).

A child’s home is supposed to be a safe haven, yet too many children experience hell as soon as they walk through their door. They step one foot inside and instead of being welcomed home, they are abused, physically or verbally. They are belittled and torn apart. The effects of the abuse last a lifetime. It changes a person emotional status sometimes even permanently.

Child abuse or child maltreatment is physical, sexual, or psychological maltreatment or neglect of a child or children, especially by a parent or other caregiver. Child abuse may include any act or failure to act by a parent or other caregiver that results in actual or potential harm to a child and can occur in a child’s home, or in the organizations, schools or communities the child interacts with.

The terms child abuse and child maltreatment are often used interchangeably, although some researchers make a distinction between them, treating child maltreatment as an umbrella term to cover neglect, exploitation, and trafficking.

Different jurisdictions have developed their own definitions of what constitutes child abuse for the purposes of removing children from their families or prosecuting a criminal charge.

Definitions of what constitutes child abuse vary among professionals, and between social and cultural groups, as well as across time. The terms abuse and maltreatment are often used interchangeably in the literature. Child maltreatment can also be an umbrella term covering all forms of child abuse and child neglect. Defining child maltreatment depends on prevailing cultural values as they relate to children, child development, and parenting. Definitions of child maltreatment can vary across the sectors of society which deal with the issue, such as child protection agencies, legal and medical communities, public health officials, researchers, practitioners, and child advocates. Since members of these various fields tend to use their own definitions, communication across disciplines can be limited, hampering efforts to identify, assess, track, treat, and prevent child maltreatment. In general, abuse refers to (usually deliberate) acts of commission while neglect refers to acts of omission.

Child maltreatment includes both acts of commission and acts of omission on the part of parents or caregivers that cause actual or threatened harm to a child.  Some health professionals and authors consider neglect as part of the definition of abuse, while others do not; this is because the harm may have been unintentional, or because the caregivers did not understand the severity of the problem, which may have been the result of cultural beliefs about how to raise a child. Delayed effects of child abuse and neglect, especially emotional neglect, and the diversity of acts that qualify as child abuse are also factors.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines child abuse and child maltreatment as “all forms of physical and/or emotional ill-treatment, sexual abuse, neglect or negligent treatment or commercial or other exploitation, resulting in actual or potential harm to the child’s health, survival, development or dignity in the context of a relationship of responsibility, trust or power.” In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses the term child maltreatment to refer to both acts of commission (abuse), which include “words or overt actions that cause harm, potential harm, or threat of harm to a child”, and acts of omission (neglect), meaning “the failure to provide for a child’s basic physical, emotional, or educational needs or to protect a child from harm or potential harm”. The United States federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act defines child abuse and neglect as, at minimum, “any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caretaker which results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation” or “an act or failure to act which presents an imminent risk of serious harm”.

 

 

We welcome collaboration with other NGO’s on anti-child abuse campaign. Contact us for more campaign details.

 

References: Unicef / US-CDC/WHO and Wikipedia.

 

Sylva Clinton.

 

 

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